Monthly Archives: August 2018

Week 13 Chicago Marathon

Here is content from two posts I shared on Facebook this week.

You. Are. Not. Alone.

Simple words. So hard to believe when struggling.

My mom surprised me with shoe tags before I ran the Boston Marathon. I’ve bought them for each marathon since. Here are my tags for this year’s Chicago Marathon when I run on the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention team on October 7th (6 weeks away – yikes!!).

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I am not alone. It’s a great reminder for me. You don’t how I’m doing today. How I’m really doing. You only know what I share. And even that is only if you are paying attention or watching out for me. You don’t know what worries and anxieties I have about tomorrow and beyond. You don’t know what I can’t let go of from the past. You don’t know what struggles and challenges I face today. What makes me want to stay in bed but won’t let me sleep. What may seem small to you but seems insurmountable to me. Maybe today was a low point and I hid it well. Maybe I struggle in silence not sure if others will listen, not sure if things will get better. These shoe tags remind me that I’m not in anything alone, even when solutions and steps forward aren’t clear. That there is hope for tomorrow. The same goes for you. You are not alone. You are never alone.

I’m also not alone in the steps and training I take towards the Chicago Marathon. I’m not alone in my highs. I’m not alone when I raise awareness and share my story. I’m not alone when I worry about all of those who may be struggling. If I will say the right thing and provide enough support to those who need it. If I’ll even notice when others need help. I’m not alone in providing this support to others and worrying if I’ve done enough. I’m not alone when I reach out, listen, do my best, and just try to be there for others. I’m not alone when I fight the stigma of mental health issues and suicide. I’m not alone when I strive to get better about being accepting of others and what they may be going through, especially when I don’t understand. Thank YOU for being part of this journey with me. WE are saving lives. WE are never alone.

Six weeks to go – I’d love your support and DONATION.

A few days ago I ran just over 21 miles while training for the AFSP (Suicide Prevention) team for the Chicago Marathon. It felt great but my run seemed crazy at times – peacocks crossed my path (true), a turkey flew at me (true – got spooked by a dog and strollers after I took my pic), and I saw a flock of flamingos (sort of true). The other craziness from this week is that I’m back in 1st place (for raising awareness & saving lives!) on the AFSP team out of 112 people. Woohoo! Thank you all! It is amazing to have so many people sharing their stories and showing their support. I’d love your help getting to 6K as my next milestone! Thank you all – WE are saving lives.

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https://afsp.donordrive.com/participant/Dave-Thompson #RaceAFSP

Week 11 Chicago Marathon

This is a test…a bit exaggerated, maybe a bit of awkward fun (at my expense), but please read to hopefully learn a bit more about how we react to others who may be struggling.

I’m in Week 11 (of 18) while training on the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention team for the Chicago Marathon. Training and raising awareness for this important cause are going well (keep those DONATIONS coming!).

But I have a struggle.

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A marathon is 26.2 miles. Anywhere from 1500 – 2000 steps per mile. ~50,000 opportunities for my shirt to rub against certain parts of my body.

Seriously.

That’s my struggle.

Every step can rub.

If it’s super hot or raining it’s even worse.

It’s distracting.

It’s frustrating.

That shower after running makes me want to scream!

Ok…PAUSE and think for a few seconds. What’s your reaction to hearing this? What thoughts went through your brain?

Did you judge?

Think I brought this on myself by running in the first place?

Think I should get over it?

Think it’s not that bad?

Think I should be stronger?

Did you feel awkward and not know what to say? Maybe wish I wasn’t sharing on this topic?

Think that you’ve been through worse so why should I complain?

I’m in no way trying to diminish the reality of mental health struggles…but even for this tiny example think about how you react and process hearing about others who are struggling. Who cares what the struggle is. Who cares how big or small you perceive the challenge. Who cares if you feel awkward and aren’t sure how to react.

We need to work through our own judgments and discomfort to be there for others. It’s not our job to judge. Who knows when something that seems small can spiral into larger issues.

Many of the reactions I listed are in 10 Things Not to Say to Someone With Depression. Be there for those around you. Listen. Let go of your judgment. Let them know that they are not alone. Sometimes all they need is someone to just be there.

If you are struggling, know that it is critical that you share with others. Know that you are not alone. Find someone who will listen. Sometimes small daily steps can help (e.g., meditation, exercise) and other times we need professional help. Share what’s going on and we’ll find a way to get through it.

I’d love your support as we NIP suicide in the bud! ;) Click here to DONATE. WE are saving lives.

And…just so you don’t lose sleep worrying about me…my new favorite running accoutrement is NipStrips. I’m saved. Problem solved. And I love the guarantee on this fantastic product that has made all the difference…if your nips aren’t fully satisfied…

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And just a few quick updates on my running progress. Week 11 and I’m still running strong. Thank you Jen for planning another long route! It is amazing that we can run 20 miles and very soon after be able to eat and grab a drink, and not be sore in the days afterwards. So what’s the difference in just running 6 more miles on race day??? I hope NOTHING this year!

The weather has been fun. Even when I get up early to run it seems I’m facing high humidity and dew points. I haven’t looked yet to see what average temps are for the Chicago Marathon. A nice chilly day in the 50s or 60s would be great!

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I ran almost 20 miles for my long run this week while Minnesota had poor air quality alerts. They suggested that you stay indoors and limit physical activity. Uh…hard to do when I have a training plan and have committed to run for a cause I believe in.

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The sun and sky were hazy cool in the morning.

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Despite some higher temps and poor air quality we ran steady regardless of any changes in elevation!

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Thanks again for your support. WE are saving lives!

Week 10 Chicago Marathon

Wow – great 10th week of training for the Chicago Marathon on the AFSP team! It was a powerful week connecting with others and raising awareness to the importance of mental health for all of us. I was also blessed by so much generosity for this cause that is so important to me and my family. I can’t thank you enough. I went from 4th or 5th in fundraising to #1…let’s keep it that way by keeping those DONATIONS coming in for AFSP! I like to think of it as I’m #1 in saving lives and raising awareness!

It’s always nice to get unexpected gifts in the mail. Here’s a training shirt for the AFSP team. My kids think it is a bit bright – I guess that’s the point :)

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Here are a few recent questions we put on the whiteboard outside of my office at work. I can’t deny the feeling of joy and connection that I get when someone reaches out to me or I get a new donation. The notes and stories inspire me and keep me going. The generosity and support touches my heart. I assume it’s a connection with doing good in the world in my sister’s name and knowing that she would be proud of what I’m doing. What gives you joy and happiness in the world? Do more of those things ;)

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This past weekend we went to the Minneapolis Farmer’s Market (after my 13 mile training run of course!). I stopped by the BBQ At the Market booth which is put on by the Face It Foundation. I met the owner and chatted for just a bit about the work that they do to “give men the support they need to face depression, take control of their recovery and get their lives back” – and all free services. Wow – what a mission. And their food was awesome too – loved it! In the past year or so I’ve had 3 different people let me know that someone connected to them (e.g., friend, neighbor, co-worker) committed suicide, and they wanted to know how they could provide support to the family. The three people who died were all men, I’m guessing all 40+ years old. Guys, you gotta talk. Share what’s going on. There is hope. There is a way out. You will get through this. But we need to do it together. Organizations like Face It can provide support that you need. Reach out to me if you ever want or need to talk. We will get through this. UPDATE: the day after I met the founder of Face It, I had someone at work approach me asking what support they could get for a middle-aged man that they know. Perfect timing. I love it when connections like that happen!

And how did I hear about Face It in the first place? By connecting with someone at work. When we share our stories amazing connections can happen. Soon after I crossed the finish line at Lola’s half marathon earlier this year wearing my “Defeat the Stigma” shirt, I heard a voice yell, “I like your shirt”. I could hear a bit of emotion in that voice, and I had a hunch they were yelling in my direction, so I stopped and turned around. I met a young man that day who shared that he has been struggling most of his life with mental health conditions and has been in and out of treatment programs. So cool that he yelled out to me. We shared our stories and then thanked and encouraged each other. Get out there and share your story, every time you do we take steps to defeat the stigma. We are all in this together. You never know when what may seem like little acts can make all the difference in someone’s life.

Thanks again for the support. CLICK HERE if you’re interested in making a DONATION to support this cause.